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Year 1

On this page, our content is matched with specifications lifted directly from the national curriculum. Spotting sheets, activity sheets and specific animal or species pages are paired with aspects of the Key Stage 1 statutory requirements of learning in the programme of study for science.

Plants


Pupils should be taught to identify and name a variety of common wild and garden plants, including deciduous and evergreen trees.

 
Pupils should be taught to identify and describe the basic structure of a variety of common flowering plants including trees.

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/425618/PRIMARY_national_curriculum_-_Science.pdf 

Pupils should use the local environment throughout the year to explore and answer questions about plants growing in their habitat. Where possible, they should observe the growth of flowers and vegetables that they have planted. They should become familiar with common names of flowers, examples of deciduous and evergreen trees, and plant structures (including leaves, flowers (blossom), petals, fruit, roots, bulb, seed, trunk, branches, stem).

Pupils might work scientifically by: observing closely, perhaps using magnifying glasses, and comparing and contrasting familiar plants; describing how they were able to identify and group them, and drawing diagrams showing the parts of different plants including trees. Pupils might keep records of how plants have changed over time, for example the leaves falling off trees and buds opening; and compare and contrast what they have found out about different plants.

 
Activity sheets
Leave your garden wildInvestigate a street tree 
 

Activity Ideas:

• If you have a green patch in your school, leave it to grow wild. Once a week let the children go outside and mark the differences over time. They could measure the height of the grass and draw the flowers that are growing. Can they name any of the plants they see?

• If you have a tree in your school, take the children out to investigate it. They will develop mathematical skills through measuring and observation. Have a look at how the tree helps its habitat. Are there any birds using the branches? Can they identify the tree from its leaves? Take the children out in summer, then again in winter. How has the tree changed?


 

Spotting Sheets
Autumn tree and leaf detectiveSummer flowersSpring tree ID 
Spring flowers spotter   
 


Activity Ideas:

• If you have any trees or flowers on your school grounds, print off spotting sheets and take the children outside. See how many they can spot. The children could take them away and complete as homework to see how many they can spot. This will encourage them to go outside when they are at home as well.

 
Species pages
Common YewScots PineSilver Birch
Common BeechEnglish OakCommon Hawthorn
SycamoreHorse ChestnutMeadow Buttercup
Common PoppyHeatherBramble
IvyFoxgloveDaisy
BluebellStinging Nettle White Clover

 

Animals

 

Pupils should be taught to identify and name a variety of common animals including fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals

Pupils should be taught to identify and name a variety of common animals that are carnivores, herbivores and omnivores

Pupils should be taught to describe and compare the structure of a variety of common animals (fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals, including pets)

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/425618/PRIMARY_national_curriculum_-_Science.pdf 


Pupils should use the local environment throughout the year to explore and answer questions about animals in their habitat. They should understand how to take care of animals taken from their local environment and the need to return them safely after study. Pupils should become familiar with the common names of some fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals, including those that are kept as pets. Pupils should have plenty of opportunities to learn the names of the main body parts (including head, neck, arms, elbows, legs, knees, face, ears, eyes, hair, mouth, teeth) through games, actions, songs and rhymes.

Pupils might work scientifically by: using their observations to compare and contrast animals at first hand or through videos and photographs, describing how they identify and group them; grouping animals according to what they eat; and using their senses to compare different textures, sounds and smells.


 
Activity sheets
Leave your garden wildStart a nature tableHow to go rock pooling 
Make your own small mammal tunnelBuild a bumblebee nest  
 

Activity Ideas:

• If you have a green patch in your school, leave it to grow wild. Take the children outside once a week to see what animals are in their wild grass patch. They can take a spotting sheet, or write down how many insects they can see. Are there any mammals in there?

• If your green patch is away from a playground area, you could help the children build a bumblebee nest. This will help your wild patch flowers and plants. You can explain to the children the importance of bees to nature. This way the children directly help bee conservation.

 

 
 Spotting sheets
Hedgerow wildlife detectiveBaby animals spotter Winter garden wildlife
Rock pool detectiveMeat eating mammalsGarden bird detective 

 Activity Ideas:

• The children could take these spotting sheets home as homework to get them outdoors outside of school hours. They could spot birds in their gardens or go for a walk to find a hedgerow.

• Can the children name these common animals without help? 

 
 Species pages
FoxBadger Brown trout 
HedgehogRobin Fallow deer

Rabbit

Grey squirrel Mallard
Swallow Starling Common Carp 
Blue tit Magpie Common Frog 
Slow Worm Grass snake Common Toad 

Seasonal changes

 

Pupils should be taught to observe changes across the four seasons

 
Pupils should be taught to observe and describe weather associated with the seasons and how day length varies

 https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/425618/PRIMARY_national_curriculum_-_Science.pdf 

Pupils should observe and talk about changes in the weather and the seasons. Note: Pupils should be warned that it is not safe to look directly at the Sun, even when wearing dark glasses.

Pupils might work scientifically by: making tables and charts about the weather; and making displays of what happens in the world around them, including day length, as the seasons change.

 
Activity sheet
Investigate a street treeMake a footprint trap Discover animal tracks and signs 

Activity Ideas

• If you have a tree in your school, take the children out to investigate it. They will develop mathematical skills through measuring and observation. Have a look at how the tree helps its habitat. Are there any birds using the branches? Can they identify the tree from its leaves? Take the children out in summer, then again in winter. How has the tree changed?

• Set up a footprint trap in the summer and again in the winter. Are there any tracks there in the summer that aren't in the winter? Discuss animals and the seasons.

 

 
Spotting sheet
Autumn tree and leaf detectiveAutumn wildlife detectiveSigns of spring spotter 
Winter garden wildlifeAfter dark spotter Woodland wildlife in summer 
Summer flowers Winter nuts and berries  Spring tree ID
   
 
Seasons pages
SpringSummer Autumn 
Winter