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Benny the Blenny's Blog



Explore life beneath the waves around Britain with Benny the Blenny

 

Benny the Blenny's Blog

Benny the Blenny's Blog

You've just got to watch my video here: vimeo.com

This video shows what my babies look like when they have left home, having just hatched from those eggs that I’ve been guarding. Swimming among the plankton in the open sea, they are very sleek with gorgeous big eyes and are between 5-10 mm long.

By eating very small plant (phyto-) plankton and animal (zoo-) plankton, the youngsters grow quickly and are then able to eat larger plankton. Bigger fish larvae and jellyfish in the plankton are a real danger and my babies have to make smart evasive moves if they feel they are about to be grabbed!

If you would like to find out more about plankton visit
www.lifeadrift.info


Thank you to the National Marine Aquarium Plymouth for their help in obtaining this video.

Benny the Blenny's Blog

We’re looking at you Dad!

Over the summer the eggs that I have been caring for have developed well; you can see them on the ceiling above my head. They look like amethyst gems (see Barbara’s eggs in the photograph) when first laid, then progress to a gold colour with a paler centre. Just before they hatch, their eyes become very obvious and it looks as though they are watching what I’m up to. I still clean all of them regularly by wiping them with my special gland (see blog 26/06/15) and protect them from predators.

It won’t be long now before the ones with well-developed eyes hatch. I will be sad to see them leave but my job is done. They need to go into the plankton and find the right size food so they can grow into young fish.

For more photos of British marine life why not check out www.marinephoto.co.uk!

Benny the Blenny's Blog

At low tide today two snorkellers came to see me. Luckily I recognised Teresa’s mask and popped out to see her and Sam. You could see fish like me if you go snorkelling when the sea is very calm and clear, but take care and always go with an adult.

Here are a couple of links on snorkelling:
www.bsac.com
www.snorkeling.co.uk

Benny the Blenny's Blog

Eek, a diving bird!

Close escape today! I was on the ‘balcony’ (all right then, the rock ledge) outside my home, nosing around when whoosh down came a diving bird, a shag. It almost caught me in its sharp beak! I flicked speedily into the back of my crevice and stayed hidden there as the shag continued to swim around my rock, prodding its beak into many of the cracks and crevices looking for food. I saw an unfortunate corkwing wrasse (a type of fish) being crunched. I am now a bit nervous about coming out again. It’s a good thing I spotted this predator so quickly. Having my eyes set so high on my head is a brilliant adaptation that helps me see well in all directions.

Benny the Blenny's Blog

No more floor space

Belinda has been back twice more. The last time she visited, she had to turn upside down to lay her eggs on my ceiling as we’ve run out of space on the floor. Of course I had to turn upside down to fertilise them too! It's quite easy for us to roll over like this. We use our pelvic (hip) and pectoral (shoulder) fins to grip the rock and keep us in position in the narrow crevice. That’s Belinda on the right, she’s cute isn’t she?